One-day Intermediate Videography Course

Capturing and delivering the best of the action

Course Objectives

To lay the foundations of an aerial videography workflow for TV, film and commercial work, including camera setup, aircraft configuration, composition and basic post-production/delivery.

 

Course Content

Using real scenarios and video content, the day will give you a good grounding for every stage of the video capture process.

You’ll begin by identifying what makes a great aerial video before moving on to the key elements of planning an aerial shoot. You’ll then learn how to set up your camera, and also the fundamentals of working to technical requirements including codecs, frame rates, bitrates and colour space.

The course will then cover the basic principles of video composition from the air. You’ll also learn how to work with your flight and production teams.

The final module covers principles of transcoding, colouration and exposure correction, as well as rough-cutting and delivery. Final Cut Pro will be used, but the principles will be equally applicable to other editing systems.

 

25th September 2018

Cotswold Airport – Gloucestershire

Course Fee £250 + VAT

Water, coffee, tea and biscuits will be available throughout the day. Lunch will be provided in the AV8 restaurant just a few yards from our training centre

Prerequisites

Skill level

Intermediate – attendees should have a basic knowledge of videography and preferably some image editing experience

 

Course Instructor – Michael Surcombe

Michael SurcombeMichael Surcombe worked in BBC production for 19 years, primarily in music and documentary programmes. In 2015 he set up his own aerial filming company, Leaping Wing, and now films regularly for both TV and corporate projects.

Recent credits include prime-time drama A Very English Scandal and David Starkey’s Reformation for BBC FOUR. Michael also works regularly as an instructor for drone operators, specialising in media training.

I worked in broadcasting at the BBC for 20 years, telling stories in both pictures and audio for most of the national networks. In 2014 I got involved with drones as part of an innovation project and never looked back. ’ I’m fascinated by what makes drone imagery ‘work’, and where the techniques overlap with and differ from what we do on the ground.

Michael Surcombe